Pridi cai uncle

In Magliano

Today is the birthday of my pridi cai uncle. The story goes that a long time ago, when he, my mother’s brother, met my father’s uncle for the first time, that uncle made the historical error of saying Pridi kaj to him (which translates roughly as Do come over, but not quite yet). A bit later my uncle did just that with a big rucksack and stayed for a week.

Ever since, Pridi kaj has been uttered with a dose of fear in my family, but they have been almost the first words in Slovenian that my Italian amore learned and is happily repeating them left and right (hence his Italianised spelling pridi cai).

And my uncle has come to visit us in Tuscany, twice, stayed for a while, and then kindly informed us that he was having a too nice time to leave just yet:

In Pitigliano, photo: MM

The olives on the pizza were ten, the foam in the glass was just right (provided that we let him wash the glass by hand), the bestia was waking him up on time, and he – forever an avid reader and student of languages – needs some more time to learn the map of Tuscany by heart.

And this is the best thing he could say.

However, some things have been left for the next pridi cai (for example, those ancient Tuscan caves).

Happy birthday and here is a little blast for the past, which probably I would have never heard of if it wasn’t for you, translated by me on the spot. Enjoy and cin cin.

 ≈ Manja Maksimovič ≈

The Rolling Stones get to meet my grandparents (Stonesi spoznajo moje stare starše) by Marko Brecelj, translated by Manja Maksimovič

In late afternoon they arrived 
In late afternoon they arrived 
Please come on in, have no fear 
Please come on in, have no fear 
Late afternoon is the best time 
The best time for a polite visit 2x

Late afternoon was drowned in darkness 
Mom was serving, we ate alone 
Late afternoon conversation was flowing 
Conversation was flowing and flowing was the wine 
The wine was flowing, the conversation was flowing 
The conversation was flowing, the neighbour flew in 
The neighbour flew in and said 

The walls are thin and the work starts at six 
The walls are thin and the work starts at six 

Dear neighbour, calm down 
Dear neighbour, don’t get upset 
Dear neighbour, calm down (why so quarrelsome) 
Dear neighbour, don’t get upset (why so quarrelsome) 

Who is this man, this man in the painting 
This stern, stern moustached man 
The painting on the wall is an old painting 
And the man in the painting is old, too 

This is my grandfather 
And the woman next to him is grandma 

What a nice picture
What a nice couple 2x

Shortly after midnight they left 
Their chauffeur Joe Smith was already sleeping 
Joe Smith, wake up!! And he started the car 3x

I opened the window and threw out the ashes 
The words and the smoke exited the room 

Advertisements

One comment

Talk to me

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s